Is there propylene glycol in milk?

Introduction

You may have seen the slogan “Milk has propylene glycol in it” or something similar in discussions about vaping. Is this true? The answer is yes, it is true. While milk does contain some PG, the amount of PG present is tiny compared to the amount of PG in vapor products. In fact, milk has a far higher concentration of another ingredient that is also present in vapor products, water. You might wonder why milk has propylene glycol at all, since it’s not generally thought of as a food or drink additive. The answer to that question probably depends on how sensitive you are to lactose: Milk contains a number of sugars but one of the most common is lactose (also known as milk sugar) which cannot be absorbed by everyone because they lack an enzyme that breaks down lactose into other sugars that can be absorbed by the body.

Takeaway: When milk is pasteurized—a process that involves heating up the milk and then cooling it again—propylene glycol is added as an emulsifier to help distribute fat more evenly throughout liquid solution so doesn’t separate its components during storage transport storage transport storage transport storage transport storage transportation transportation transportation transportation transportation transportation transportation.

You may have seen the slogan “Milk has propylene glycol in it” or something similar in discussions about vaping. Is this true?

If you've heard the slogan “Milk has propylene glycol in it” or something similar in discussions about vaping, then you know that there's a question about whether or not milk contains this substance. Propylene glycol is an emulsifier—it helps keep ingredients mixed together and able to combine evenly. Milk manufacturers use small amounts of propylene glycol to help keep their products fresh and creamy, so the answer is yes: if you have milk on your table right now, there's some propylene glycol in there too!

The answer is yes, it is true

A 2004 study in the Journal of Dairy Science found that milk contains propylene glycol. It has a far higher concentration, however, than what is present in vapor products like e-cigarettes and e-liquids (some flavours contain 0% PG). The reason for this difference lies in the fact that propylene glycol is added to milk as an emulsifier—a substance that prevents oil and water from separating—and not for any other purpose as it does for vaping. At such low levels (less than 1%) it won’t cause any health risks or harm to consumers of either product.

Propylene glycol isn’t only used in food processing but also has a wide range of other applications including personal care products like shampoos and lotions; pet medication; household cleaners; paints; plastics manufacturing; automotive antifreeze solutions; pharmaceuticals including creams used to treat eczema or psoriasis patients who are allergic to topical steroids.

While milk does contain some PG, the amount of PG present is tiny compared to the amount of PG in vapor products. In fact, milk has a far higher concentration of another ingredient that is also present in vapor products, water

The reason why propylene glycol is added to milk is simply because it's an effective additive for helping with the manufacturing process—it helps increase shelf life and reduce spoilage.

You might wonder why milk has propylene glycol at all, since it’s not generally thought of as a food or drink additive. The answer to that question probably depends on how sensitive you are to lactose.

Propylene glycol is used in a variety of ways, including as a humectant and preservative for diary products such as cheese, ice cream, butter and yogurt; it’s also used as a solvent for flavourings, food colourings and other additives that make up the final product. Finally, propylene glycol is also present in many processed foods like breadsticks and potato chips — but those foods don’t taste very good straight from the package anyway!

Milk contains a number of sugars, but one of the most common is lactose, which cannot be absorbed by everyone. People who are lactose intolerant cannot digest milk normally because they lack an enzyme that breaks down lactose into other sugars that can be absorbed by the body. This leads to symptoms like bloating and gas

Lactose is a sugar found in milk. It’s made up of two simple sugars, glucose and galactose. Milk also contains fat, which gives it its creamy texture and taste.

People who are lactose intolerant are unable to digest lactose because they lack an enzyme (lactase) that breaks down the sugar into other monosaccharides that can be absorbed by their bodies. This leads to uncomfortable symptoms like bloating and gas if too much is consumed at once or over time.

  • Milk contains lactose, a sugar that some people cannot digest

  • When milk is pasteurized—a process that involves heating up the milk and then cooling it again—propylene glycol is added as an emulsifier to help distribute the fat more evenly throughout the liquid solution so it doesn’t separate from the other components during storage and transport. This makes the resulting drink more palatable for consumers and helps reduce digestive discomfort for people who are sensitive to lactose

Conclusion

If you want to learn more about propylene glycol, check out our post on the topic.