What does an allergic reaction to propylene glycol look like?

Introduction

Propylene glycol is a chemical that's found in many foods and products. It's often used to keep food moist, preserve the taste of food products like potato chips, or serve as a solvent for flavours like vanilla extract. Propylene glycol is commonly used in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals as well. The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists propylene glycol as "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS). However, some people are allergic to propylene glycol and may experience an allergic reaction when exposed to small amounts of this substance over time (like by licking their lips after applying lipstick). If you think you have an allergy to propylene glycol or another ingredient in your cosmetics or other personal care products please see your doctor immediately!

If you experience swelling of the tongue, lips, or throat, seek immediate medical attention. Symptoms can worsen quickly and can be life-threatening if they affect your airways

In addition to swelling, other symptoms that indicate an allergic reaction include:

  • Difficult breathing

  • Difficulty swallowing

  • Chest tightness or shortness of breath (from wheezing)

  • Dizziness or fainting

  • Hives

If your skin feels itchy or warm to the touch, this could be a sign of an allergic reaction. If you have hives, or lesions on your skin that resemble boils or pimples, seek treatment for your symptoms immediately

Symptoms can also worsen quickly in people with propylene glycol allergies, so if you notice any changes in how you feel after using an item that contains propylene glycol, see a doctor right away!

Propylene glycol is used in many products that may come into contact with your skin. Some pharmaceuticals and cosmetics contain propylene glycol. It's also found in boiler fluids, antifreeze, and other chemicals.

Propylene glycol is a common additive in many types of food as well. It's often used as a flavouring carrier and solvent for flavours such as vanilla extract and food colouring

You may have seen a lot of headlines about propylene glycol in the news lately, but you may still be wondering exactly what it is and what it does. Here's a quick primer:

  • Propylene glycol is a common additive in many types of food as well. It's often used as a flavouring carrier and solvent for flavours such as vanilla extract and food colouring. In soda, for example, it helps keep your favourite citrus beverage from separating into layers of oils and water. If you've ever noticed your ice cream starting to separate after sitting out at room temperature—or if you've ever tried freezing an orange juice concentrate without adding any extra ingredients like sugar or corn syrup—it's because they contain some amount of PG!

  • In cosmetics and personal care products like moisturizers, hair care products (including shampoos), soaps/hand sanitizers/body wash etc., propylene glycol acts as an emollient to help smooth out rough patches on skin while giving them some moisture (i.e., lubricity) back again after washing off all that soap residue during showering or bathing sessions; this same property also works well when making lotions because those too need something oily enough not only so they'll rub correctly onto our arms but also so they won't drip down too quickly into one big mess before we have time to apply them properly onto ourselves first!

If you have asthma, exposure to propylene glycol can trigger an asthmatic episode. It can also cause difficulty breathing and wheezing in people who are allergic to it

If you have asthma, exposure to propylene glycol can trigger an asthmatic episode. It can also cause difficulty breathing and wheezing in people who are allergic to it.

If you’re a heavy user of e-cigs, this may be the culprit behind your symptoms. If so, it’s important that you speak with your doctor about reducing your use or finding ways to cope with the effects of propylene glycol exposure.

Most people don't experience side effects from propylene glycol unless they're allergic to it or they ingest large amounts of it over time

Propylene glycol is a common additive in many types of food as well as some medicines, including topical creams, eye drops and contact lens solutions. It's also found in boiler fluids, antifreeze, and other chemicals.

If you suspect you have an allergy to propylene glycol seek emergency treatment right away!

If you suspect that you have an allergy to propylene glycol, seek emergency treatment right away. Call a doctor if you have trouble breathing or feel like your throat is closing up! If you think that a severe allergic reaction may occur, seek emergency treatment immediately. If it's possible for you to carry an epinephrine auto-injector for the specific substance (like an EpiPen), do so and have it on hand with your doctor's approval.

You should also avoid all products containing propylene glycol as they can trigger dangerous reactions in those who are allergic to it.

Conclusion

We hope that this article has helped you understand what propylene glycol is and how it can affect your body. If you think you're experiencing an allergic reaction to propylene glycol, contact your doctor immediately. For more info on PG see our blog.